Good article, but it seems like you can chalk up almost all of those problems to the experience level of whomever is spraying the foam. Spray foam isn't an inherently bad product, but it's pretty easy to botch if the hired company is inexperienced. Fiberglass may be foolproof to install, but then again it has a terrible R-Value compared to a good spray foam. People just need to get referrals and do their homework whenever they research a spray foam contractor.

How Much Is Spray Foam Insulation For Attic


If you’re looking for an effective and efficient Elastomeric Roof Coating, you might want to consider the Kool Seal roof coating. This product comes in a 115 fl oz container and is white in color. It is easy to apply and use that it can stick well even in the harshest weather conditions. This product offers maximum clinging to the RV roof despite the temperature. You can also rely on its effectiveness no matter the type of weather. http://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=share
I did a LOT of prep before using this product. Cleaned, vacuumed, installed additional insulation etc etc etc. This spray foam was easy to work with, and did it's job as it was supposed to. If you are curious, this kit was purchased because - every "foam insulation company" I contacted either did not call back (due to no interest) OR this was too small of a job. That is why I went DIY on this one, that and: I was advised by one of these companies that they have a minimum $2k job because ... (insert your answer here, but I will choose that everyone needs to eat). http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Apply coating when the roof is dry and the sealant has set. You will be using a 9-inch heavy-duty frame, ½-inch paint roller for spreading coating on roof or 1-1/4-inch roller for dipping in pail, and a 5–to-6-foot extension pole. Use a 3/4-inch roller with basecoats and emulsions. Map out your roof and make each pail fill that area. See Elastek Product Sheets for recommended coverage. An inexpensive 3-inch or 4-inch brush should be used to reach areas not possible with a roller. Use a stiff paintbrush for applying 103 Crack & Joint Sealant.
Solvent-based polyurethane coatings have excellent adhesion and when used as a base coat over asphalt, EPDM, TPO or PVC, it eliminates the need for a primer. The resulting savings on labor and material more than offsets the higher cost of the product. When top coated with silicone, it gives you the best of both worlds. It's also an excellent gutter and RV coating.
I was hesitant to buy this because many reviews stated that it didn't cover as advertised, but after reading/following all directions, everything turned out perfectly. It even seemed to apply slightly more than the 650 bd/ft that was advertised. The application process was very easy to learn and I applied all of the product in about 1 hour and 10 minutes- prep time included. I couldn't be happier and I purchased another kit this morning.
I have to insulate my walls at the end of this week. That does not give me time to procure slow-rise foam, so my stud cavities will be filled with foam before I'm ready to fill the corner voids. I will not be able to drill straight through the corner studs. Instead, I will have to remove material where the studs meet. What sort of tool do you envisioning me holding while I create space to pump foam into my 1972 corner voids? https://youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o?app=desktop
Spray foam is a chemical product created by two materials, isocyanate and polyol resin, which react when mixed with each other and expand up to 30-60 times its liquid volume after it is sprayed in place. This expansion makes it useful as a specialty packing material which forms to the shape of the product being packaged and produces a high thermal insulating value with virtually no air infiltration.
Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts.
Spray foam is available in two different types: open-cell spray foam which is usually $0.44 to $0.65 per board foot and closed-cell spray foam which is about $1 to $1.50 per board foot. The average cost to have spray foam professionally installed is about $2,314. This number can vary depending on whether the home being insulated is newly constructed. However, finished homes are not a good candidate for spray foam insulation but great for weatherization or an energy audit.  
The roof must be thoroughly cleaned, and allowed to dry thoroughly. This is a critical step to ensure a successful coating application. Be careful not to damage the lap seams. Care should be taken when pressure washing not to disturb the integrity of the underlying roof membrane particularly where there are adhered seams. Refer to the specific coating manufacturer you are using for their specific requirements for roof preparation.

Roof Coating Seal

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