This is in great contrast to my friend's experience. Her attic spaces were sprayed and the foam is actually pretty, and I was in her attic 6-7 days after it was sprayed and could hardly smell anything when I stuck my face up to the foam. And she did not have to clean up one speck of dust during or after the spraying. I got the name/number of the guy from her who managed her attic project, but between the time he did my house and the time he did her house, he was let go from the company who did her attic and hired by another company. He assured me everything would be the same, etc., etc., and I had no reason to believe anything had changed, but the sprayers who did my house later admitted they had never sprayed an attic before and I also found out that the foam used in my attic was from a different manufacturer. Neither my friend nor I had any idea this guy was with different company then, until the week after they filled my attic with off ratio foam, and my home with toxic vapors.  

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Solvent-based polyurethane coatings have excellent adhesion and when used as a base coat over asphalt, EPDM, TPO or PVC, it eliminates the need for a primer. The resulting savings on labor and material more than offsets the higher cost of the product. When top coated with silicone, it gives you the best of both worlds. It's also an excellent gutter and RV coating.

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Staple plastic to the framing around the windows (and doors). Don’t worry about covering the gap between the window and the framing because you’ll want to fill those with low-expanding canned foam specifically designed for windows. Cover all the switch and outlet boxes with masking tape so you don’t fill them with foam. You don’t need to use gasketed electrical boxes when you insulate exterior walls like you would if you were using fiberglass—the foam will air-seal around the box.
I have to insulate my walls at the end of this week. That does not give me time to procure slow-rise foam, so my stud cavities will be filled with foam before I'm ready to fill the corner voids. I will not be able to drill straight through the corner studs. Instead, I will have to remove material where the studs meet. What sort of tool do you envisioning me holding while I create space to pump foam into my 1972 corner voids? https://youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o?app=desktop
I did a LOT of prep before using this product. Cleaned, vacuumed, installed additional insulation etc etc etc. This spray foam was easy to work with, and did it's job as it was supposed to. If you are curious, this kit was purchased because - every "foam insulation company" I contacted either did not call back (due to no interest) OR this was too small of a job. That is why I went DIY on this one, that and: I was advised by one of these companies that they have a minimum $2k job because ... (insert your answer here, but I will choose that everyone needs to eat). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&app=desktop
Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!
I'm in the process of redoing my basement and read through the posts. I took out one inch styrofoam covered by 1/4 " beadboard and installed 2X4s and plan on putting in fiberglass batts between them(r-13) with 1/2 in drywall over top of that. Do you think I will see a significat increase in heat control? Should I have done more?... it's a little after the fact, but still curious to know if I will see a big difference based on your experience.
Even if you use Liquid EPDM Roof, be sure to check your roof periodically for leaks. If you leave your roof in rough condition or bad repair, you could be in for huge problems and costly repairs. Your entire coach is beneath your roof. When repairing leaks and general waterproofing, the Liquid EPDM Roof coatings is the least expensive and most effective choice. That’s the facts about Liquid EPDM Roof and its benefits. It's a money-saving, environmentally friendly alternative.
If you don't have the patience to slowly fill the void with spray foam through holes drilled in one of the studs, you could (if you were an experienced carpenter) use a Sawzall to remove one of the studs and re-frame the corner as a two-stud corner. Then you could either insulate the void with a fiberglass batt or simply present the two-stud corner to the spray-foam contractor as an accessible corner.
Sealection 500 is a spray-applied adhesive, which once applied, expands in place using water-blown technology, without CFCs, HCFCs, or ozone-depleting chemicals. Unlike traditional fiberglass insulation, Sealection 500 will maintain its performance; time and temperature have no effect on the spray foam insulation's R-value of 3.81 at 1 inch. Sealection 500 never deteriorates or decomposes. The product retains its shape and half-pound density over time, and never settles or compacts. http://youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o
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