The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.)
Having a recreational vehicle, see to it that you protect its roof from anything that would otherwise damage it or decrease its lifespan. One of the best maintenance and repair products you need is the best RV roof coating. It can offer you a host of benefits we’ve mentioned above, so it is really necessary for your RV cleaning and maintenance products arsenal. Pick based on those we’ve featured here as well as on certain factors, including your roof material, for the desired results. Did you like this guide? Share it on Facebook today! If you’re looking for more products in RV cleaning and maintenance, then I suggest going for these articles: best RV wash and wax, best RV roof sealants, best RV caulks, best RV wax, best RV roof cleaners and best RV awning cleaners. I do hope you will like them. Happy shopping!
Good article, but it seems like you can chalk up almost all of those problems to the experience level of whomever is spraying the foam. Spray foam isn't an inherently bad product, but it's pretty easy to botch if the hired company is inexperienced. Fiberglass may be foolproof to install, but then again it has a terrible R-Value compared to a good spray foam. People just need to get referrals and do their homework whenever they research a spray foam contractor.
Check with the coating manufacturer who may be able to suggest applicators who have used their products and have familiarity with the application. Another option would be to interview contractors and ask specific questions about their proven ability to install roof coatings. Contractors affiliated with the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) or local roofing contractor trade associations typically are more knowledgeable. Consult those groups’ websites for contractors.
OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article.
Sean, thanks for jumping in and answering John's questions. About choosing the right foam, I intentionally avoided the open cell vs. closed cell foam debate. I did this partly because it's worthy of an article all by itself, but mainly I didn't include it because, despite all the warnings the two sides issue about the other, I've never personally seen a problem caused by using open cell where they should've used closed cell or vice versa. I'm sure things like that happen; I just haven't seen it yet.
What do you mean by "our AC units require fresh air ventilation"? Fresh air doesn't come from the attic. If there's an atmospheric combustion appliance in the attic, such as an 80 AFUE furnace, then you shouldn't be encapsulating the attic anyway. If that's the case, you don't want spray foam on the roofline at all. You can either change out the furnace to a sealed combustion unit or do your insulating and air-sealing at the flat-ceiling level.
Thank you, Allison. We have a split system unit (actually 5) with the heat being propane. The foam guy said that it needed ventilation, so completely sealing the attic wouldn't be a good idea. It sounds like you are saying that the systems need to be vented out of the attic or replaced with some type of closed system. But I shouldn't bother spraying if the plan is to leave the soffet vents open. Is that correct?
a) Make sure that your house has been well heated prior to installation because the foam expands at different rates as it hits surfaces with different temperatures. If it is cold outside the sheathing may be much colder than the studs consequently the foam may expand more from the sides of the wall cavity creating air pockets in the wall cavity. This can be minimized by an experienced installer.

Spray foam insulation, like other insulation, saves on energy costs and lowers utility bills. Studies by the US Department of Energy show that 40% of a home's energy is lost as the result of air infiltration through walls, windows and doorways. Buildings treated with spray foam insulation insulate as much as 50% better than traditional insulation products.


For large jobs, professionals such as Dr. Energy Saver use two-part foam, which comes in larger containers. With 2-part spray foam, it's necessary to mix separate resin and catalyst compounds at the application nozzle. Combining these ingredients starts a chemical reaction that creates expanding foam. Contractors use small 2-part foam "kits" to air-seal an attic or to seal and insulate ductwork. To insulate an entire attic or wood-framed wall with spray foam, the resin and catalyst compounds are pumped to the application nozzle from 50-gallon drums in a specially equipped truck.
If you’re looking for an effective and efficient Elastomeric Roof Coating, you might want to consider the Kool Seal roof coating. This product comes in a 115 fl oz container and is white in color. It is easy to apply and use that it can stick well even in the harshest weather conditions. This product offers maximum clinging to the RV roof despite the temperature. You can also rely on its effectiveness no matter the type of weather. http://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=share
One of the high-tech insulation products being utilized these days is a foam-spray product called "Icynene," which is a foam that starts as two liquid components (a and b, if you will) that are heated up and sent through two hoses and meet at a tip of a gun where the magic begins. This is a thin film that expands to 100 times its volume in eight seconds, when it's permanently set up.
Current guidelines recommend up to 10 inches of insulation in your attic . This is usually added to the ground, rather than the roof line, which results in the loss of your storage area, due to not being able to refit floor boards after installation. By implementing spray foam insulation to the roof line, you regain the lost 10 inches, thus increasing storage, height and practicality.
This website uses cookies and other tracking technologies (also known as pixels or beacons) to aid your experience (such as viewing videos), as well as “performance cookies” to analyze your use of this website and to assist with marketing efforts. If you click the “Accept All Cookies” button or continue navigating the website, you agree to having those first and third-party cookies set on your device. If you do not wish to accept cookies from this website, you can choose to not allow cookies from this website by updating your browser preferences. For more information on how we use Cookies, please read our Privacy Policy. https://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=youtube_gdata
One thing I wanted to mention was that I think your price point is a little high and that might deter people from considering spray foam. As a project manager for a spray foam company for years I can tell you that we offer 0.5 Lb. open-cell foam at around $.25/board foot. We even offer a 1.0 Lb. open-cell foam for less/the same cost as you quoted the 0.5 Lb. foam for above. The 1/0 Lb. open-cell foam has an R-value of almost 5.
This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.)
If you don't have the patience to slowly fill the void with spray foam through holes drilled in one of the studs, you could (if you were an experienced carpenter) use a Sawzall to remove one of the studs and re-frame the corner as a two-stud corner. Then you could either insulate the void with a fiberglass batt or simply present the two-stud corner to the spray-foam contractor as an accessible corner.
When it comes to weatherproofing your RV roof, the Flex Seal liquid roof is one of those we’re proud to recommend because it can be applied in all temperatures. It can also protect your camper roof from even the harshest weathers, including rain, snow and wind. With it, you can keep your roof protected from changing temperatures, eventually prolonging its lifespan.

I started using Gaco years ago primarily to solve ponding water Problem. It has work well, solved my problems with other roofing options and repairs as well as many other Flat roof issues.  My only problems were experienced when I did not clean the surface well enough for good adhesion.  Follow the Instructions.  Great product and highly recommended. .


Spray foam insulation is a great product. Homes insulated with it can be some of the most efficient and comfortable homes built. I've been in plenty of these homes and can tell you that when spray foam is installed properly, they outperform 99% of fiberglass batt-insulated, stick-built homes. (I can also tell you that 73% of all statistics are made up on the spot, so please don't ask for documentation of that statistic.)
One thing I wanted to mention was that I think your price point is a little high and that might deter people from considering spray foam. As a project manager for a spray foam company for years I can tell you that we offer 0.5 Lb. open-cell foam at around $.25/board foot. We even offer a 1.0 Lb. open-cell foam for less/the same cost as you quoted the 0.5 Lb. foam for above. The 1/0 Lb. open-cell foam has an R-value of almost 5.
The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.)

Spray Foam Companies


Spray foam insulation, like other insulation, saves on energy costs and lowers utility bills. Studies by the US Department of Energy show that 40% of a home's energy is lost as the result of air infiltration through walls, windows and doorways. Buildings treated with spray foam insulation insulate as much as 50% better than traditional insulation products.
Acrylic coatings are typically applied in two coats, with the second running perpendicular to the first. 1 gallon per 100 square feet is a good estimate for these coatings, as they do not need to be applied nearly as thick as many other coatings. These coatings can be sprayed or roll-applied. Acrylic coatings generally require a re-coat within 2-3 years of application.
As mentioned above elastomeric coatings can be used to fix almost all types of roofs. Examples of common roof types that will work well with elastomeric coatings include; wood, polyurethane foam, single-ply roofing, modified bitumen, metal roofs, concrete and built-up roofing. If you aren't sure your roof type will work well elastomeric coatings, do not hesitate to contact us. Our experts are always willing to help.
I have used the Froth-Pak 200 to air-seal rim joists--the area above the foundation wall in a basement. The first time I used it I did not shake the canisters well enough and the foam did not cure properly. Don't just shake the box for a few seconds. I take the tanks out of the box so I can shake/invert each tank for a minute or two. You will be able to hear the chemical sloshing around in the tanks. Also, don't ignore the recommended temperature for application--around 75 degrees F.
Amanda previously has worked as a breaking news and crime reporter, TV news producer, and editor in Flint and Detroit. Throughout her career as a journalist, she has won several awards from the Detroit Chapter of Society of Professional Journalists and the Michigan Press Association. As part of the RetroFoam of Michigan family, Amanda uses her experience as a journalist to write content that will help educate homeowners on the benefits of foam insulation. When Amanda isn’t writing, she’s spending time with her husband and rescued huskies. She also loves knitting, making art, cooking, and hosting dinner and a movie night for friends and family.

This coating is also efficient with a coverage area reaching between 42 and 46 feet. And regardless of the weather, you can apply and use it in your roof to achieve the protection for it you need. Just as what you can read in RV rubber roof coating reviews, this product can work in all temperatures. Regardless it is hot or cold outside, you can easily apply and ensure of its adhesion on your recreational vehicle roof. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
I used this for the rim-joist in our home. A couple things: I put 1in solid core foam (cut to size) in each bay before using the spray foam. I also was able to do a relatively 'thick' spray to close off any potential gaps that may have existed. I turned off the HVAC and turned on some fans in the windows to exhaust out the fumes, and wore a mask (3m respirator).

I don't know if it's common or uncommon, but installing a layer of rigid foam above your roof sheathing in order to interrupt thermal bridging is always a good idea, and is preferable in all respects to a roof assembly without any rigid foam above the sheathing. If you decide to install rigid foam above the roof sheathing, you shouldn't use closed-cell spray foam under the sheathing; either use open-cell spray foam (which is vapor-permeable) or a fluffy insulation like cellulose, mineral wool, or fiberglass (any of which will allow the roof sheathing to dry to the interior).

Silicone coatings are typically produced by adding a catalyst and solvents to a silicone base. Because the silicone is a natural material, these coatings are bio-degradable. They can be applied to a roofing system using many different techniques, including spraying or rolling. Silicone coatings are available in many colors, including reflective white and translucent.
After researching this, Im curious about a method called poor mans sprayfoam where foamboard is cut to size between studs and sprayfoamed around the perimeter. Aside from the labour doing the job yourself, the cost seems comparable, is one better than the other? What about the quality of the canned sprayfoam around the perimeter? When i see sprayfoam done, it is never a full depth of the studs, so you would get 2.5-3 inches in a 3.5" (2x4) wall. Any thoughts?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Polyurethane Spray Foam Insulation is used in industries ranging from mining to movies, from cold storage to marine flotation. Spray Foam Insulation’s ability to seal out air and insulate quickly means it’s always in high demand for residential and commercial applications. Spray Foam Insulation is critical for solving our nation’s energy challenges because it dramatically reduces the energy needed to heat and cool our homes and offices.
Today’s “third generation” of blowing agents have a GWP of 700 to 1000 which is still remarkably high considering water/CO2 has a GWP of 1. However, innovation from some chemical manufacturers like the Chemours Company have introduced the next generation of HFO blowing agents such as Opteon 1100, which significantly reduces the GWP impact when using closed-cell spray foam insulation products.
In addition, it's difficult for an inexperienced installer to evenly spread the insulation foam over a surface. Miissing spots can leave holes and gaps for cold air to get through. Proceed with this project yourself only if you're doing a small insulation project -- such as installing foam in a crawl space or around your plumbing. Leave larger projects like the attic, basement or garage to the professional insulation contractors. Insulation professionals have the tools, equipment and background knowledge necessary. Moreover, they know how to accurately price insulation, whereas you could inaccurately budget for a DIY project and end up paying significantly more. Don't take the medical, physical or financial risks that come with pursuing this as a DIY project unless you're absolutely certain you have the skills.
If you're chemically sensitive, it's probably not a good idea to get it installed, but it's also not a good idea to breathe musty air from the crawl space either. In addition, your house and its contents are made of lots of materials that affect your indoor air quality. If you're really concerned about this, hire a company to test your air and tell you what you can do about it.

How Much Is Spray Foam Insulation Per Sq Ft

×