Spray foam insulation, like other insulation, saves on energy costs and lowers utility bills. Studies by the US Department of Energy show that 40% of a home's energy is lost as the result of air infiltration through walls, windows and doorways. Buildings treated with spray foam insulation insulate as much as 50% better than traditional insulation products.

Silicone based coatings can be spray or roller-applied, and should utilize a medium-nap roller when rolled. These coatings are applied anywhere from 2 to 3.5 gallons per 100 square feet, depending on the substrate. Silicone has two major advantages over the other four types of coatings that should be considered when searching for the best roof coating: 1) it can resist ponding water for extended periods of time and 2) it can adhere to most substrates without a primer. Because of these two major advantages, silicone is the best roof coating that satisfies both quality and cost-effectiveness.

Spray foam insulation is typically priced by volume, meaning your cost will depend on how much material you need to use to insulate your space, although other factors may influence price as well. In most cases, the cost of spray foam insulation is more than worth it, as it's a once and done upgrade that will not only provide energy savings in your home, but also improve your home's overall comfort.


Spray foam comes in two flavors, open cell and closed cell, and provides both parts of the building envelope - the insulation and the air barrier. The building envelope should completely surround the conditioned space, and the insulation needs to be in contact with the air barrier. Since spray foam is both insulation and air barrier, proper alignment of insulation and air barrier is guaranteed.
The drawback to spray foam insulation is it's been known to cause certain health issues such irritation of the eye and the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Direct contact can cause inflammation to the skin, and some individuals have been known to break out in a rash on the arms, chest and neck area. Spray foam insulation has also been linked to a few cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This condition can cause:
Good article, but it seems like you can chalk up almost all of those problems to the experience level of whomever is spraying the foam. Spray foam isn't an inherently bad product, but it's pretty easy to botch if the hired company is inexperienced. Fiberglass may be foolproof to install, but then again it has a terrible R-Value compared to a good spray foam. People just need to get referrals and do their homework whenever they research a spray foam contractor. http://www.youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o?app=desktop
We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.

I did a LOT of prep before using this product. Cleaned, vacuumed, installed additional insulation etc etc etc. This spray foam was easy to work with, and did it's job as it was supposed to. If you are curious, this kit was purchased because - every "foam insulation company" I contacted either did not call back (due to no interest) OR this was too small of a job. That is why I went DIY on this one, that and: I was advised by one of these companies that they have a minimum $2k job because ... (insert your answer here, but I will choose that everyone needs to eat). http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
EPDM (Liquid Roof), (Liquid Rubber) Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer. Liquid Rubber is available in White, Black Or Grey. The RV product Liquid Roof is available only in white. However, you can customize the color by adding no more than three ounces per gallon of an universal colorant (Glycol Colorant for light colors and for medium to heavy colors use a solvent based colorant available at most paint stores). If the desired color is still not achieved you may add up to ONE more additional ounce of colorant. Once the colorant is added and color achieved then you add catalyst and mix and you are ready! The Liquid Roof coating is specifically designed for RVs and trailers and mobile homes; items that are in motion. Liquid Rubber, the commercial product, is available in white or black. Custom colors are available for orders over 100 gallons. Approved Uses for Liquid EPDM Rubber.

Although we are a small-town company, we can handle any size project or building. We have been blessed to work for residential homeowners as well as corporations like Bell Helicopter, Taco Bell, Tyson Foods, and even the Texas Rangers!  Our conservative Christian family values won’t let us give you anything less than an honest evaluation of the best product for your specific application. SprayFoam Texas installs the most energy efficient attic systems available anywhere.  https://m.youtube.com/e/ggLAUsiuI_o
I am an Architect in Toronto. I am designing a new roof addition to a row house building. Because of existing conditions and the shape of the new roof. It may be easiest to use closed cell spray foam within the areas of the joists. My question is when spray foam is used in this situation do I need to worry about how the joist members may be thermal bridges? It is not common to provide a little bit of rigid insulation to protect the joist members? The additional layer of outboard insulation will require an extra layer of plywood above the insulation which will add to cost.

I used this for the rim-joist in our home. A couple things: I put 1in solid core foam (cut to size) in each bay before using the spray foam. I also was able to do a relatively 'thick' spray to close off any potential gaps that may have existed. I turned off the HVAC and turned on some fans in the windows to exhaust out the fumes, and wore a mask (3m respirator).

Spray Foam Basement Ceiling


The problem you saw with the closed cell foam pulling away like that is due to the heat of the foam was to hot. It was actually curing out and making foam before it could adhere to the wood. The installer wasn't reading his foam correctly. He should of stopped and turned down the heat on his hose temp. Also installers have to be aware that as the sun rises and the temp in attics rises the subtrates get hotter as well. This will cause the installer to adjust his heat when installing the foam as the temp changes thru out the day.  
My other question was gonna be this. We ripped all the drywall out after Hurricane Harvey and we found some latent termite damage from some time back. One of the common studs in one corner is pretty well eaten to shreds. I was gonna brace it but then I read about more modern framing practices and I read how each stud is a thermal bridge. So now I'm thinking that I won't bother with it because the house hasn't fallen down and the foam might help a little. Unless you say to brace the stud. Then I'll do it, Martin! :) 

For large jobs, professionals such as Dr. Energy Saver use two-part foam, which comes in larger containers. With 2-part spray foam, it's necessary to mix separate resin and catalyst compounds at the application nozzle. Combining these ingredients starts a chemical reaction that creates expanding foam. Contractors use small 2-part foam "kits" to air-seal an attic or to seal and insulate ductwork. To insulate an entire attic or wood-framed wall with spray foam, the resin and catalyst compounds are pumped to the application nozzle from 50-gallon drums in a specially equipped truck.
We are turning our roof into an unvented roof assembly by raising the roof and blowing in SPF. We are planning to leave the existing vapor barrier down but remove the fiberglass batting and then adding 6" of SPF in all the cavities, to completely seal and insulate the house. Should we have any concerns about doing it "upside down" and not spraying the foam directly to the underside/sheathing of the roof? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
When it comes to weatherproofing your RV roof, the Flex Seal liquid roof is one of those we’re proud to recommend because it can be applied in all temperatures. It can also protect your camper roof from even the harshest weathers, including rain, snow and wind. With it, you can keep your roof protected from changing temperatures, eventually prolonging its lifespan.
Elastomeric coatings offer effective and affordable solutions for fixing roof leaks. The coatings can be used to repair any type of roof leak. The elastomeric roof coatings can be used throughout the year because they stretch and contract easily to adjust to winter and summer temperatures. It is usually made using polymeric products such as acrylic alongside white pigments like titanium dioxide. This helps create an opaque and reflexive final product. 

How Much Is Spray Foam


Henry 587 Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Coating is Henry 587 Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a premium high solids formula offering better weather protection solar reflectivity and longevity than economy grade reflective roof coatings. Cured coating forms a permeable membrane which prevents liquid infiltration but allows moisture vapor to vent or breathe out of underlying substrate. Recommended ...  More + Product Details Close 

Spray Foam Metal Building


What do you mean by "our AC units require fresh air ventilation"? Fresh air doesn't come from the attic. If there's an atmospheric combustion appliance in the attic, such as an 80 AFUE furnace, then you shouldn't be encapsulating the attic anyway. If that's the case, you don't want spray foam on the roofline at all. You can either change out the furnace to a sealed combustion unit or do your insulating and air-sealing at the flat-ceiling level. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Repair and seal roof penetrations, tears, open seams, etc. using Elastek 103 Crack & Joint Sealant and reinforce with polyester roof fabric as necessary. In larger or deep ponding areas, apply Elastek 500 Puddle Plaster to fill in areas that hold water. Avoid using plastic roof cement. Serious ponding should be referred to a roofing contractor. Blisters in previous coatings may be opened but these areas must be allowed to dry-out completely. Blisters in the roofing ply should be left alone unless likely to break. Caulk and reinforce open seams, roof penetrations, cracks, and tears. These are potential leak points so work carefully and thoroughly. Use fabric to build flashings around roof edges or roof penetrations, and to reinforce various coating repairs. A polyester fabric is used because it will stretch with the coatings. (Fiberglas fabric is not recommended.) Fabric is normally cut to extend three inches beyond the repaired area in all directions. The coating is applied to the roof surface and the fabric is immediately pushed into the wet surface. An additional coat is applied over the fabric and the patch is allowed to dry. If your roof has stucco parapets, examine them for cracks along the sides and top. These areas often permit water to enter the wall and can cause blisters and wrinkles in the roof surface. Repair with Elastek 103 Crack & Joint Sealant. If you do not have parapets, examine the metal drip edge for a tight seal with the roof membrane. Use 4″ or 6″ roofing fabric covered under and over with Crack & Joint Sealant to seal cracks along drip edges, penetrations, and open seams.
Loctite tite foam is a new generation of Loctite tite foam is a new generation of polyurethane-based insulating foam sealant that expands to fill seal and insulate gaps and cracks inside or out. It is white polymer foam based on purified and concentrated ingredients that provides 4 times more density versus conventional foams for better durability and insulation. ...  More + Product Details Close
United Coatings™ Roof Coat Elastomeric Coating is an effective coating for providing long-term reflectivity over a wide range of roofing substrates. The high reflectivity of Roof Coat Elastomeric Coating keeps the roof substrate cool, which not only helps prolong its longevity but also helps save on energy costs. Roof Coat Elastomeric Coating’s rich consistency uniformly covers the textured profile of various substrates, forming a flexible monolithic membrane that provides protection from normal weathering, aging, and ultraviolet exposure.
This coating is also efficient with a coverage area reaching between 42 and 46 feet. And regardless of the weather, you can apply and use it in your roof to achieve the protection for it you need. Just as what you can read in RV rubber roof coating reviews, this product can work in all temperatures. Regardless it is hot or cold outside, you can easily apply and ensure of its adhesion on your recreational vehicle roof.
Light-density open-cell SPF is commonly known as half-pound foam. It is a semi-rigid material with a sponge-like appearance that expands during installation and creates small, open cells that are filled with carbon dioxide. Due to its ability to expand during the application process, it fills cracks, crevices and voids and adheres to irregular surfaces or substrates to form an air sealing insulation.[12]
Note:  A board foot is defined as a 12" x 12" square at 1" thick. Actual output can be affected by a number of factors including temperature and humidity. The theoretical yield has become an industry standard for identifying certain sizes of two component kits. Theoretical yield calculations are performed in perfect laboratory conditions, without taking into account the loss of blowing agent or the variations in application methods and types.
We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.
However, coating asphalt shingles and built-up composition roofs requires more caution. The National Roofing Contractors Association’s (NRCA) director of technical services has stated "The roofing industry is aware of a number of issues that could have negative consequences for field application of coatings over asphalt shingle roof systems. Anyone considering this type of application should be aware of the concerns so they can weigh them against the benefits claimed in coating product promotional materials."[2]

The problem you saw with the closed cell foam pulling away like that is due to the heat of the foam was to hot. It was actually curing out and making foam before it could adhere to the wood. The installer wasn't reading his foam correctly. He should of stopped and turned down the heat on his hose temp. Also installers have to be aware that as the sun rises and the temp in attics rises the subtrates get hotter as well. This will cause the installer to adjust his heat when installing the foam as the temp changes thru out the day.  
I recently did a remodel project for my basement using spray foam insulation. The original builder has used fiberglass, but I wanted the best insulation i could find. We chose closed cell foam because it blocks moisture from getting into the house. It took one day to install and was fumey for about 3 hours. It was pretty cool watching it being done. It comes out as a liquid and then expands rapidly into a foam. It's quick! Then they took a types of saw to shave it flat with the wall studs so we could then go ahead and drywall.

Roof Coating Denver Colorado

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