One of the best ways to achieve it is to use the Heng’s rubber coating that can protect it from the elements, including sleet, wind, rain, and snow and UV rays. The product also does well in keeping our roof protected from dirt, leaves and twigs. With such protection received, our roof won’t degrade and we prevent ruining our recreational vehicle investment.

The problem was that the installer was doing his first spray foam job ever, and the thickness of the insulation varied from zero (visible roof deck) to about 9". Unfortunately, good average thickness doesn't cut it. The coverage needs to be uniform because a lot of heat will go through the under-insulated areas. (See my article on flat or lumpy insulation performance.)

Spray Foam Companies


EPDM coatings has been featured in Article Insider, as well as Roofers Exchange, Building Service Management and recently won Metal Roofing Magazines product of the year. Since it’s the only liquid form of EPDM rubber in the world, made right here in the U.S.A. there are many distinct advantages to the product vs other roof coatings. It waterproof as soon as it is applied, will take standing water indefinitely yes that means 365 days a year of continued ponding water. The product comes with a pre-measured bottle of catalyst that is added to the container. Once the material is mixed you have a 4 hour time period to apply it before it starts the initial set up process. The product requires daytime temperatures of at least 55° to cure. Temperatures can fall below 55° at and once they rise again above the 55 degree mark it will continue to cure. Any non-opened can be stored up to one year without it going bad. Roof leak repairs are an unwelcome reality to every owner of a residential or commercial building, mobile home or recreational vehicle. Roof leak repairs can include almost anything including replacing damaged shingles, mending holes, fixing roof leaks, or repairing dents with roof coatings.
These coatings contain various types of acrylic polymer, and are typically formulated to help extend the coating’s life and improve durability. Acrylic coatings are available in a number of colors but are most commonly used as white reflective coatings. Thanks to its durability and low cost, many contractors and facility managers believe this to be the best roof coating.
Although spray polyurethane foam has many advantages over other types of insulation, spray foam installation isn’t foolproof. Some builders have reported problems with sloppy foam insulation. For example, some installers have been known to begin spraying before the chemical components are up to temperature, which can affect component mixing and foam performance. When components are poorly mixed, or mixed in the wrong ratio or at the wrong temperature, cured foam has been known to shrink away from rafters or studs, leaving cracks. Some installers rush through their spraying, resulting in voids.
R-value, the thermal resistance measure of insulation, varies between all insulation products whether they are fiberglass, cellulose, open-cell spray foam insulation or closed-cell sprayed-in foam insulation. Generally speaking the rule of thumb is the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power.  Focusing on spray foam insulation materials, there is a difference between the two main types. According to industry publication, Fine Home Building, the R-value for open-cell spray foam is between R-3.5 – R-3.6 per inch. However, there are open-cell spray foam insulation products actually offer R-3.7 per inch such as Icynene Classic and Icynene Classic Max. The open cell structure of low density foam insulation means the R-value is lower than its closed-cell counterpart. Nevertheless, open-cell spray foam does offer superior and consistent thermal insulation and air sealing properties.

Spray polyurethane foam, or SPF, is the main type of 2-part, closed-cell spray foam used by insulation contractors. Large-scale insulation jobs require special equipment as well as safety gear to protect the installer from chemical fumes during installation. When the foam cures and hardens just several minutes after application, it's completely safe for as long as it stays in place.

For maximum durability and leak resistance, we recommend that two coats of topcoat be applied at 100 sq. ft. per gallon, or a minimum of 20 mils dry coating. If two complete topcoats are not applied, always apply two thick coats to problem areas such as scuppers, drain areas, ponding areas, seams, and repaired areas. Avoid using Elastek Solar Magic™ or The Shield™ on ponding roofs. Clean skin and tools promptly with water.

I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US. 


We had issues with getting this foam to turn green in summertime in the South. We needed up spending an additional $300 on being able to spray this foam: 110 window a/c for shop & a $60 tarp to drape over the top, to keep the temps down. The areas where we had trouble-shooted were sticky & even after we wiped it down, the new green foam wouldn't stick. My husband had to apply Liquid Nails to it. For over $800, I expected alot more, plus the sellers customer service skills were in need of improvement. http://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=kp

Although spray foam insulation has been in use since the 1940s, primarily for aircraft, for the past 30 years, continual product innovation has seen the increased adoption of spray foam insulation in residential and commercial construction. The rapid growth of sprayed foam insulation in building construction, thanks in part to its immediate and long-term benefits, has allowed the insulation material to sit confidently alongside traditional insulation types in providing thermal comfort for building occupants.
Yes, you're right that all of the problems mentioned above are related to the installer. I didn't try to hide that and even used the word 'installer' in two of the four headings. I can see how you'd think that the title is misleading, but in the end you can't separate spray foam insulation from its installation. Some people have the mistaken impression that if you get spray foam in your house, your home will outperform all others. My point here is that that's not true. https://youtu.be/ggLAUsiuI_o
Roof coatings are easy to install. Smaller roofs in good, serviceable condition can be a weekend do-it-yourself (DIY) project. Larger roofs with leaks and ponding water issues should be coated by a qualified professional. Additional roof coating products, such as foam or coatings designed for seams, may be required underneath the main coating layers. Supplement coating products are used to reinforce damaged or leak-prone problem areas.[3]

Silicone coatings are typically produced by adding a catalyst and solvents to a silicone base. Because the silicone is a natural material, these coatings are bio-degradable. They can be applied to a roofing system using many different techniques, including spraying or rolling. Silicone coatings are available in many colors, including reflective white and translucent. https://youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts.
I am on my third project with foam it green. I like the simplicity of it, the color blending to make it green, it alerts you quickly if something is wrong with the blending so you don't waste alot of valuable material. Follow the instructions closely, put in the prep time and you will have no issues. It seems most people's negative comments have to do with not following instructions or guidelines. It is about as close to point and shoot as you can get but there are still some essential details that need attention. The only complaint I have is the fragility of the gun, last project I cracked one on accident but luckily needed two kits to finish the project so I had a back up, but I was more careful to gently lay the gun down between applications.
I don't know if it's common or uncommon, but installing a layer of rigid foam above your roof sheathing in order to interrupt thermal bridging is always a good idea, and is preferable in all respects to a roof assembly without any rigid foam above the sheathing. If you decide to install rigid foam above the roof sheathing, you shouldn't use closed-cell spray foam under the sheathing; either use open-cell spray foam (which is vapor-permeable) or a fluffy insulation like cellulose, mineral wool, or fiberglass (any of which will allow the roof sheathing to dry to the interior).
Amanda previously has worked as a breaking news and crime reporter, TV news producer, and editor in Flint and Detroit. Throughout her career as a journalist, she has won several awards from the Detroit Chapter of Society of Professional Journalists and the Michigan Press Association. As part of the RetroFoam of Michigan family, Amanda uses her experience as a journalist to write content that will help educate homeowners on the benefits of foam insulation. When Amanda isn’t writing, she’s spending time with her husband and rescued huskies. She also loves knitting, making art, cooking, and hosting dinner and a movie night for friends and family.

How Much To Spray Foam Crawl Space

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