Most closed-cell spray foam is now formed using hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents that have high global warming potential, partially or completely offsetting the climate benefits of the energy savings they can offer. In the United States, HFCs are scheduled to be phased out by January, 2021. A few spray foam suppliers have started supplying spray foam blown with hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) blowing agents without this problem as of early 2017.[14]
Liquid Rubber is generally fine when applied in one coat at a 20 mil film (42 sq ft per gallon) thickness and will still withstand extremes. That is the beauty of the EPDM polymer. A second coat would provide insurance where exposures are likely to be very extreme. Radical extremes in temperature where constant surface temperatures reach 250°F or above or -20°F or below. Warning, though, if the second coat is applied at the wrong time, it may create cracking, fissures or bubbling. The second coat should be applied either when the first coat is still tacky or when that first coat has had a chance to fully cure (up to 3 months.) https://youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o?version=3
The local foam installer that I used here in Hilton Head told me he looked for some peeling back of the foam. This was ensuring that it was at the perfect temperature which helped them maximize their yield (profit). I have open cell foam and it pulled away a little, and did so immediately (within minutes). They went back after they were done to any spots that pulled away too much and filled them with the touch up kit; they were looking for the top edge to roll just a little bit. 

Tip Top Roofing Inc. has attained high standards for roofing restoration with 26 years of experience. We are a fully licensed contractor ( 826997) for your security. Tip Top Roofing Inc. uses top-quality products and we strive to be the experts in the business. Our experienced talent and efforts are always continual in our services. We provide information on roofing products and solutions to better our customers requirements.  
We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock.
There are several types of reflective roof coatings that impart varied reflectance rates/ values. Typically, the reflective coatings are what are commonly referred to as white coatings and there are also aluminum coatings typically used with asphalt. Highly reflective white roof coatings are typically comprised of acrylics, urethanes, silicones, SBS, SEBS, and other types.
If you’re not familiar, spray foam is a type of insulation that expands after you spray. The foam expands and seals, avoiding any type of unnecessary moisture (which can create mold) or encouraging pests to eat through your walls. It protects the lining of your house, and even can protect the heating and cooling of your house during those unbearably cold or hot days.
That’s $58.3 Billion dollars. That’s roughly how much money we wasted in 2010 in the US according to the Department of Energy because of air leaking out of our building envelopes. If your building leaks energy, you’re paying more for energy than you need to. Clearly you’re not alone. If you’re ready to claim your share of the savings, it’s quicker and easier than you think.

You've got no argument from me there, Dennis. Getting a good installer if you're going with spray foam is crucial. Many builders or homeowners don't know how to find one, however, and that's where third party inspections come in. Also, even good installers have bad days, but if someone comes in behind them with a measuring probe and a Blower Door, there will be fewer sub-par foam jobs.   http://www.youtube.com/embed/ggLAUsiuI_o


Stop making the same repairs using less reliable products that are not EPDM based, are not UV and ozone resistant, and do not have flexibility built into the material (causing them to crack). EPDM rubber will expand and contract with any surface as seasons change, and will not crack as a result of temperature changes. Other products will begin to bubble and crack in less than two years.


Today, each of the 50 states follows a different set of building codes making navigating these codes confusing, particularly for architects or builders that have projects in multiple states. In some cases, the building code changes significantly between the state and certain cities or counties within the state. For example, at the time of writing Arizona had adopted the 2015 IRC Building Code, however, Phoenix was on the 2012 IRC, IBC and IECC code. With the majority of states either on the 2009, 2012 or 2015 code, below are some high-level points to consider and about how spray foam insulation contributes.
25 years of field study and thousands of satisfied customers have made Liquid EPDM Rubber the roof repair solution for many applications. Liquid EPDM Rubber is so versatile that it can easily be applied to metal, rubber, fiberglass, concrete, wood, fabric, foam and many other surfaces. Liquid EPDM Rubber Coating has proven to outlast acrylic, urethane and elastomerics by 4 times. There may be lower-cost products on the market but none that have the long-term durability, waterproofing ability and tolerance to extreme temperatures like Liquid EPDM. Other roofing coatings require two and three coats so not only does this triple your material cost but also triples your labor time. If you are looking to add less weight to your roof with a one coat system that has proven itself over the years look no further. Here is a sample of some of the companies during that time who have come back time and time again!

How Much For Spray Foam Roof


This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.)
I recently did a remodel project for my basement using spray foam insulation. The original builder has used fiberglass, but I wanted the best insulation i could find. We chose closed cell foam because it blocks moisture from getting into the house. It took one day to install and was fumey for about 3 hours. It was pretty cool watching it being done. It comes out as a liquid and then expands rapidly into a foam. It's quick! Then they took a types of saw to shave it flat with the wall studs so we could then go ahead and drywall.

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