When choosing a waterproofing and sealing product, we must see to it that we can easily use and apply it using simple tools, including a squeegee or a paint roller. With ease of application, we can be certain that we can achieve hassle-free application and smoother and more attractive finish than other products could give. So when reviewing the products we have featured above, we have made sure that they are easy to apply.
I have used the Froth-Pak 200 to air-seal rim joists--the area above the foundation wall in a basement. The first time I used it I did not shake the canisters well enough and the foam did not cure properly. Don't just shake the box for a few seconds. I take the tanks out of the box so I can shake/invert each tank for a minute or two. You will be able to hear the chemical sloshing around in the tanks. Also, don't ignore the recommended temperature for application--around 75 degrees F.
I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US. 
In general, cantilevered steel beams are a nightmare. If part of the steel beam is in contact with exterior temperatures, then it's best if the interior portion of the steel beam is covered on all sides with insulation. This is generally impossible (because the interior portion of the cantilevered beam generally supports a load, meaning that you can't wrap the steel beam in insulation on all sides).
Spray foam insulation is typically priced by volume, meaning your cost will depend on how much material you need to use to insulate your space, although other factors may influence price as well. In most cases, the cost of spray foam insulation is more than worth it, as it's a once and done upgrade that will not only provide energy savings in your home, but also improve your home's overall comfort.

How Much Does Spray Foam


Stop making the same repairs using less reliable products that are not EPDM based, are not UV and ozone resistant, and do not have flexibility built into the material (causing them to crack). EPDM rubber will expand and contract with any surface as seasons change, and will not crack as a result of temperature changes. Other products will begin to bubble and crack in less than two years.
Polyurethane is a closed-cell foam insulation material that initially contains a low-conductivity gas in its cells.[5] As a result of the high thermal resistance of the gas, spray polyurethane insulation typically has an initial R-value around R-3.4 to R-6.7 per inch.[5] In comparison, blown fiberglass typically has an R-Value of only R-3 to R-4 per inch.[6]
You've got no argument from me there, Dennis. Getting a good installer if you're going with spray foam is crucial. Many builders or homeowners don't know how to find one, however, and that's where third party inspections come in. Also, even good installers have bad days, but if someone comes in behind them with a measuring probe and a Blower Door, there will be fewer sub-par foam jobs.  
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Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts.
What more is that we also think it is one of the most durable among liquid roof coatings on the market. It can last for several years, working continuously in protecting your roof from outside elements, such as dust, leaves, twigs and debris that would otherwise damage your roof. When it happens, your roof might have leaks and cause discomfort inside your RV.
Spray foam insulation or spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is an alternative to traditional building insulation such as fiberglass. A two-component mixture composed of isocyanate and polyol resin comes together at the tip of a gun, and forms an expanding foam that is sprayed onto roof tiles, concrete slabs, into wall cavities, or through holes drilled in into a cavity of a finished wall.
Allison--would be very interested in your take on the GHG issues of foams, which have received lots of smart commentary recently. To highlight a few: architect Jesse Thompson's comments on Tom's Good vs Bad post on Energy Circle, the very thorough piece by Alex Wilson on Green Building Advisor and Michael Anschel's cautionary diatribe on Remodeling. 
One of the best ways to achieve it is to use the Heng’s rubber coating that can protect it from the elements, including sleet, wind, rain, and snow and UV rays. The product also does well in keeping our roof protected from dirt, leaves and twigs. With such protection received, our roof won’t degrade and we prevent ruining our recreational vehicle investment.
I don't know if it's common or uncommon, but installing a layer of rigid foam above your roof sheathing in order to interrupt thermal bridging is always a good idea, and is preferable in all respects to a roof assembly without any rigid foam above the sheathing. If you decide to install rigid foam above the roof sheathing, you shouldn't use closed-cell spray foam under the sheathing; either use open-cell spray foam (which is vapor-permeable) or a fluffy insulation like cellulose, mineral wool, or fiberglass (any of which will allow the roof sheathing to dry to the interior). http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Henry 587 Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Coating is Henry 587 Dura-Brite White Elastomeric Roof Coating is a premium high solids formula offering better weather protection solar reflectivity and longevity than economy grade reflective roof coatings. Cured coating forms a permeable membrane which prevents liquid infiltration but allows moisture vapor to vent or breathe out of underlying substrate. Recommended ...  More + Product Details Close
Typical roof coating dry film thickness vary from paint film thickness (plus or minus 3 dry mils) to more than 40 dry mils. This means a roof coating actually becomes the top layer of a composite roof membrane and underlying system. As such, the roof coating is the topmost layer of protection for the membrane, receiving the impact of sunlight (both infrared and ultraviolet (UV), rain, hail and physical damage. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.)

My other question was gonna be this. We ripped all the drywall out after Hurricane Harvey and we found some latent termite damage from some time back. One of the common studs in one corner is pretty well eaten to shreds. I was gonna brace it but then I read about more modern framing practices and I read how each stud is a thermal bridge. So now I'm thinking that I won't bother with it because the house hasn't fallen down and the foam might help a little. Unless you say to brace the stud. Then I'll do it, Martin! :)
One thing I wanted to mention was that I think your price point is a little high and that might deter people from considering spray foam. As a project manager for a spray foam company for years I can tell you that we offer 0.5 Lb. open-cell foam at around $.25/board foot. We even offer a 1.0 Lb. open-cell foam for less/the same cost as you quoted the 0.5 Lb. foam for above. The 1/0 Lb. open-cell foam has an R-value of almost 5.
Thank you, Allison. We have a split system unit (actually 5) with the heat being propane. The foam guy said that it needed ventilation, so completely sealing the attic wouldn't be a good idea. It sounds like you are saying that the systems need to be vented out of the attic or replaced with some type of closed system. But I shouldn't bother spraying if the plan is to leave the soffet vents open. Is that correct?

Spray Foam Attic Insulation


If you’re looking for an effective and efficient Elastomeric Roof Coating, you might want to consider the Kool Seal roof coating. This product comes in a 115 fl oz container and is white in color. It is easy to apply and use that it can stick well even in the harshest weather conditions. This product offers maximum clinging to the RV roof despite the temperature. You can also rely on its effectiveness no matter the type of weather.

Light-density open-cell SPF is commonly known as half-pound foam. It is a semi-rigid material with a sponge-like appearance that expands during installation and creates small, open cells that are filled with carbon dioxide. Due to its ability to expand during the application process, it fills cracks, crevices and voids and adheres to irregular surfaces or substrates to form an air sealing insulation.[12] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=youtube_gdata
When choosing a waterproofing and sealing product, we must see to it that we can easily use and apply it using simple tools, including a squeegee or a paint roller. With ease of application, we can be certain that we can achieve hassle-free application and smoother and more attractive finish than other products could give. So when reviewing the products we have featured above, we have made sure that they are easy to apply.

Roof Coating

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