If you're chemically sensitive, it's probably not a good idea to get it installed, but it's also not a good idea to breathe musty air from the crawl space either. In addition, your house and its contents are made of lots of materials that affect your indoor air quality. If you're really concerned about this, hire a company to test your air and tell you what you can do about it.
NovaTuff PC-425 An Epoxy Protection Coating, similar to NovaTuff PC-450 but with enhanced flexibility and adhesion. Waterproofing grade. Formulated for continuous underwater submersion and for waterproofing pools, ponds, fountains, tanks, waterfalls etc. Mini-fiber additive aides in bonding/adhesion to difficult surfaces. Excellent chemical and abrasion resistance. Resistant to acids, solvents, caustics, hydrocarbons, salt water, etc. Use submerged or above grade. https://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=youtube_gdata
Here's a simpler, less expensive alternative: Cut some 2-inch-thick rigid-foam insulation and glue it to the subfloor between the joists or support it with nails driven partway into the joists. Then fill any gaps between the edges of the foam boards and the joists using the canned spray foam sold at home centers or hardware stores. An even easier option is to nail the foam panels against the bottom edge of the joists and seal the joints with canned foam, but you'll lose some headroom and access to any pipes and wires between the joists. As with spray-foam kits, protect yourself and the floor from the dripping globs of canned foam. A full face shield, gloves, and a hat would be a good start.

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Q. "I talked to a building product supplier for WALLTITE spray foam, he is suggesting to use 2" or 3" of closed cell-spray foam in the joists areas instead of the batts insulation. He says it will work with outboard rigid insulation. There is a location of a cantilevered floor area with steel beam so I may need to use spray foam to protect the steel beam. It would then be convenient continue to spray in the floor joist cavities and then apply 5" of polyiso outboard of the bottom cantilever floor sheathing."
Closed-cell (aka two-pound foam) is denser than open-cell at about 2 pounds per cubic foot. Its R-Value is between 6-6.5 per inch. As a result, this kind of foam is much more expensive than its counterpart. The reason closed-cell doesn't need a vapor retarder is because it already has one. It's permeance is 0.8 perm, which means it can handle cold climates without the use of an additional board or drywall. Closed-cell uses hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) as part of its makeup. However, this material has been known to have a high global warming effect. If you want a green insulation solution, this is not the material to use. A way to avoid this and still use closed-cell is by installing it alongside fiberglass batts. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=youtube_gdata
One of the key differentiators between traditional insulation materials and spray foam insulation is the latter’s ability to insulate and air seal. Foam insulation provides an air barrier to wherever it is applied to help mitigate air leakage from the building. Air sealing the building envelope with sprayed-in foam insulation also helps address moisture ingress to reduce the risk of mold and mildew growth as well as the formation of ice dams in colder climate zones during the winter months.  When you compare foam insulation with traditional fiberglass insulation and cellulose insulation, sprayed insulation minimizes air infiltration, it assists in limiting moisture vapor from entering and escaping the home, which in turn reduces the load on heating and cooling systems. Below is a video that compares fiberglass, cellulose and open-cell spray foam in terms of insulating and air sealing value.

spray foam walls


Note:  A board foot is defined as a 12" x 12" square at 1" thick. Actual output can be affected by a number of factors including temperature and humidity. The theoretical yield has become an industry standard for identifying certain sizes of two component kits. Theoretical yield calculations are performed in perfect laboratory conditions, without taking into account the loss of blowing agent or the variations in application methods and types.
Yes, you're right that all of the problems mentioned above are related to the installer. I didn't try to hide that and even used the word 'installer' in two of the four headings. I can see how you'd think that the title is misleading, but in the end you can't separate spray foam insulation from its installation. Some people have the mistaken impression that if you get spray foam in your house, your home will outperform all others. My point here is that that's not true. http://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o?version=3
You probably have some familiarity with spray foam insulation, and you may have even used the foam that comes in pressured spray cans at home improvement retailers. This foam is know as one-part foam, meaning that it is one continuous mixture that is simply applied to the area in need. One-part foam is frequently used for sealing small gaps and cracks. http://youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
With constant exposure to heat, cold, UV radiation, rain, snow, hail, high winds and possible mechanical damage, a roof can be the most vulnerable component of a building’s exterior. However, a roof’s long-term performance can be enhanced — and major roofing problems avoided — with correct design, quality materials, proper installation and workmanship, and comprehensive care.

how much is closed cell spray foam


Current guidelines recommend up to 10 inches of insulation in your attic . This is usually added to the ground, rather than the roof line, which results in the loss of your storage area, due to not being able to refit floor boards after installation. By implementing spray foam insulation to the roof line, you regain the lost 10 inches, thus increasing storage, height and practicality.

spray foam roofing


“It’s been scientifically proven that the temp of the shingles rises only a couple of degrees when there is an unvented attic compared to a vented attic,” said Garry Barlow, estimator at RetroFoam of Michigan. “If we lived in a southern state it has been proven that the longevity of the shingle did diminish by only one year. In the northern states there was no difference in the life span of the shingles.”
For 2×4 stud walls, the fiberglass insulation will have to be split to fit. In this case, we sprayed just under 2 in. of foam (R-10.8), and split 3-1/2-in. R-13 batts in half (R-6.5) to achieve an R-17.3 insulation value. Never cram oversize batts into a wall cavity because fiberglass insulation loses R-value when it’s compressed. You could save money by spraying 1 in. of foam and adding more fiberglass, but don’t spray less than 1 in.—the foam will no longer serve as an air barrier. This particular foam creates its own vapor barrier if sprayed 2 in. thick.
NovaTuff PC-425 An Epoxy Protection Coating, similar to NovaTuff PC-450 but with enhanced flexibility and adhesion. Waterproofing grade. Formulated for continuous underwater submersion and for waterproofing pools, ponds, fountains, tanks, waterfalls etc. Mini-fiber additive aides in bonding/adhesion to difficult surfaces. Excellent chemical and abrasion resistance. Resistant to acids, solvents, caustics, hydrocarbons, salt water, etc. Use submerged or above grade.
With constant exposure to heat, cold, UV radiation, rain, snow, hail, high winds and possible mechanical damage, a roof can be the most vulnerable component of a building’s exterior. However, a roof’s long-term performance can be enhanced — and major roofing problems avoided — with correct design, quality materials, proper installation and workmanship, and comprehensive care.

how much is closed cell spray foam


I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US.  https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
I am building a house in Central Texas (Caldwell). Several builders are cautious about using foam insulation and/or a closed attic. I would like to use both. Here in Texas, heat and humidity (except for the past few years of drought) are a continuing problem. Which type of foam would be the best to use in our home, where should the vapor barrier be or should be use one at all, if we are using fans in the exterior walls to supply fresh air to the house, do we need a vented attic or will it cause more problems than it solve? I have printed out your article and the blogs to give to my contractors and architect, but I would really appreciate your comments on the products being used in my part of the US.  https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Water-based acrylic coatings have more than 30 years of proven performance over a wide range of substrates. It is the coating of choice for metal roofs since it is highly reflective, can be easily tinted and is not extremely slippery when damp. When used with our rust primer, even rusted roofs can be saved. TIP: If you have a metal roof or a low slope roof that doesn't pond water, consider acrylic coatings.
Spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is a spray-applied plastic that is widely used to insulate buildings and seal cracks and gaps, making the building more energy-efficient and comfortable. SPF insulation is known to resist heat transfer extremely well, and it offers a highly effective solution in reducing unwanted air infiltration through cracks, seams, and joints. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&feature=share
The insulation at eaves level will leave your loft area comfortable for use and free from condensation. By installing the insulation at rafter level, it keeps the loft void warmer and prevents condensation build-up, which can otherwise occur when increasing insulation at ceiling level. The warmer, drier, cleaner roof space eliminates the risk of pipes and tanks freezing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Liquid Roof is great for repairs also. Many of our customers contact us after driving their unit under a low bridge or under trees where it causes significant scratches or rips. The application of the Liquid Roof literally saves you thousands when compared to a new roof. One coat, one time and years and years of worry free maintenance with your RV. How many other products on the market can make that claim? Preparations is simply; a mild detergent wash with something like Simple Green, Top Job etc and be sure the surface is thoroughly dry before applying the coating. It is also a good rule of thumb to inspect your roof twice a year to be sure that nothing has fallen on it or there are not areas that are cause for alarm. Should you have any questions about application or proper preparation simply give our office a call. Anyone of our sales representatives will be more than happy to walk you thought the process.
Sealection 500 is a spray-applied adhesive, which once applied, expands in place using water-blown technology, without CFCs, HCFCs, or ozone-depleting chemicals. Unlike traditional fiberglass insulation, Sealection 500 will maintain its performance; time and temperature have no effect on the spray foam insulation's R-value of 3.81 at 1 inch. Sealection 500 never deteriorates or decomposes. The product retains its shape and half-pound density over time, and never settles or compacts.
I did a LOT of prep before using this product. Cleaned, vacuumed, installed additional insulation etc etc etc. This spray foam was easy to work with, and did it's job as it was supposed to. If you are curious, this kit was purchased because - every "foam insulation company" I contacted either did not call back (due to no interest) OR this was too small of a job. That is why I went DIY on this one, that and: I was advised by one of these companies that they have a minimum $2k job because ... (insert your answer here, but I will choose that everyone needs to eat).
Sporadic cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) have also been reported in workers exposed to isocyanates. The symptoms may seem like the flu, with fever, muscle aches, and headaches. Other symptoms may include a dry cough, chest tightness, and difficult breathing. Individuals with chronic HP often experience progressively more difficult breathing, fatigue, and weight loss. Individuals with acute HP typically develop symptoms 4–6 hours after exposure.[4]
During colder months, 2 component foam is very sensitive to temperature variances. Per product instructions, both tank temperatures need to be above 70°F (21°C) for at least 24 hours prior to use. All application surfaces should be clean/dry and above 60°F (16°C) prior to application. Variance outside of the recommended temperature can affect foam yield and performance.
Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!

spray foam exterior walls


Most closed-cell spray foam is now formed using hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents that have high global warming potential, partially or completely offsetting the climate benefits of the energy savings they can offer. In the United States, HFCs are scheduled to be phased out by January, 2021. A few spray foam suppliers have started supplying spray foam blown with hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) blowing agents without this problem as of early 2017.[14]

how much does it cost for spray foam insulation


Wall spray foam has a dynamic effect on your walls. Every nook and cranny becomes filled, which prevents against lost air or the entry of air from outside. These energy savings from wall spray foam can become immense: up to 50 percent off your energy bill when coupled with foam in the attic. Wall spray foam also presents a waterproof barrier to the outside. Since it does not absorb moisture like traditional insulation, it protects your siding and walls from deterioration. http://www.youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o
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