Though foam insulation has a higher upfront cost than fiberglass or cellulose, it recoups this expenditure in a relatively short period of time. Additionally, the insulation’s permanence means that it will continue to generate savings over the life of your structure. The durability of this insulation means that you can rest easy in the knowledge that at least one component of your structure will stand the test of time. https://youtube.com/v/ggLAUsiuI_o

You probably have some familiarity with spray foam insulation, and you may have even used the foam that comes in pressured spray cans at home improvement retailers. This foam is know as one-part foam, meaning that it is one continuous mixture that is simply applied to the area in need. One-part foam is frequently used for sealing small gaps and cracks.
I recently did a remodel project for my basement using spray foam insulation. The original builder has used fiberglass, but I wanted the best insulation i could find. We chose closed cell foam because it blocks moisture from getting into the house. It took one day to install and was fumey for about 3 hours. It was pretty cool watching it being done. It comes out as a liquid and then expands rapidly into a foam. It's quick! Then they took a types of saw to shave it flat with the wall studs so we could then go ahead and drywall.
This is more common with closed cell foam, but it happens with open cell foam, too. Since closed cell foam has a higher R-value per inch, installers generally spray 2" in walls and 3" in rooflines to meet the energy code requirements of R-13 and R-19, respectively. (I'm not going to dive into the energy code here, but these numbers apply to many climate zones, the latter being allowed under the UA tradeoffs rule. See the Energy Nerd's blog on this topic if you want to argue.) http://youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube_gdata&v=ggLAUsiuI_o
Liquid Roof is a liquefied version of a synthetic rubber typically referred to as EPDM. The letters EPDM stand for ethylene, propylene, diene monomer and M class. Prior to the liquefied version emerging on to the market, rolls of the rubber were used for waterproofing roofs. The liquids are much easier to apply. Can fill cracks and crevices. Liquid EPDM can go where the sheet version could never effectively coat. The liquid roof coatings have more uses. They can be used on RV roofs and other vehicles. They can be applied to a wide range of roofing materials including metal, fiberglass and wood (although wood is not a warrantied application and require the use of the ProFlex primer first). Always consult your roofer to determine if aftermarket coatings are acceptable given the condition of your overall roof. The use of an undercoating means the liquid roof can be applied to built-up and asphalt-based coatings (with the use of the ProFlex primer).
You’ll have to install a new tip every time you stop spraying for more than 30 seconds because the foam will set inside the nozzle and clog it. Spray foam kits come with extra tips, but it’s still important to (1) clear the room of everything that could get in the way, (2) decide which areas you’ll spray first, (3) put ladders wherever you need them, and (4) set up a fan or two to vent the fumes outdoors.
Acrylic coatings are typically applied in two coats, with the second running perpendicular to the first. 1 gallon per 100 square feet is a good estimate for these coatings, as they do not need to be applied nearly as thick as many other coatings. These coatings can be sprayed or roll-applied. Acrylic coatings generally require a re-coat within 2-3 years of application.

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Unlike fiberglass, cellulose or other loose fill products, our Foamsulate products can be applied with precision almost anywhere, expanding to completely fill gaps and spaces with a long-lasting solid. No matter how irregular the shape, how rough the surface or how hidden the area, Foamsulate products create an exact fit and an effective, high-quality air barrier that lasts. Foamsulate™ can be used wherever air can get in:
You’ll have to install a new tip every time you stop spraying for more than 30 seconds because the foam will set inside the nozzle and clog it. Spray foam kits come with extra tips, but it’s still important to (1) clear the room of everything that could get in the way, (2) decide which areas you’ll spray first, (3) put ladders wherever you need them, and (4) set up a fan or two to vent the fumes outdoors.

Also, I'm wondering... Is this website is being regularly updated? A local installer (in Oct, 2010) in MA quoted over twice the price you list here. "Open cell alone ~$1.35 per sq ft for R-13. Or a 'hybrid method' using 2inch closed cell for R-13 followed by 1.5inch open cell for R-6. Hybrid is $2.85 per sq foot for R-19 rating". Maybe installers are charging higher prices to profit from those trying to meet government energy rebate by Dec 31?

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We carry a full line-up of the best roof coatings and roof waterproofing products - all tested in extreme climates. Our lines include both high-performance and cost-effective solutions. RoofMate HT is a high performance Elastomeric Roof Sealant for light traffic areas. Lucas 6000 universal is a superior high performance top coating. SilverWhite aluminized metal roof coating for metal roofs helps prevent rust. Roof Mate from United Coating has formulas for all type of roofs and  warranties available for up to 15 years. NovaTuff 2-part flexible epoxy systems are top-of-the-line waterproofing grade roof coatings with extremen chemical and salt resistance. For a cost effective quality foam roof recoat, we recommend UltraShield acrylic elastomeric roof coating. UltraShield is available in popular earth-tone colors and in 55G drums.


Allison--would be very interested in your take on the GHG issues of foams, which have received lots of smart commentary recently. To highlight a few: architect Jesse Thompson's comments on Tom's Good vs Bad post on Energy Circle, the very thorough piece by Alex Wilson on Green Building Advisor and Michael Anschel's cautionary diatribe on Remodeling. 
The Canadian National Building Code references the CAN/ULC S705.2 National Application Standard which must be followed during all installations of 2lb medium density closed cell polyurethane foam. Every installer of CAN/ULC-S705.1 compliant medium density, spray applied foam must be licensed in order to spray foam and hold valid photo ID issued by their Quality Assurance Program (QAP) provider showing their license is in good standing.

Spray foam can be used for a variety of applications, including attics, crawl spaces, walls, and more. At Dr. Energy Saver, we specialize in spray foam installation that makes your home more efficient and comfortable. If you're interested in learning more about how spray foam can help your home, call Dr. Energy Saver for a consultation and estimate.
Staple plastic to the framing around the windows (and doors). Don’t worry about covering the gap between the window and the framing because you’ll want to fill those with low-expanding canned foam specifically designed for windows. Cover all the switch and outlet boxes with masking tape so you don’t fill them with foam. You don’t need to use gasketed electrical boxes when you insulate exterior walls like you would if you were using fiberglass—the foam will air-seal around the box.
During colder months, 2 component foam is very sensitive to temperature variances. Per product instructions, both tank temperatures need to be above 70°F (21°C) for at least 24 hours prior to use. All application surfaces should be clean/dry and above 60°F (16°C) prior to application. Variance outside of the recommended temperature can affect foam yield and performance.

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Rust-Oleum® 780 Elastomeric Roof Coating provides a high initial reflectivity value of 85%, energy efficiency, long term durability and excellent resistance to weathering and dirt pick-up. This elastomeric roof coating is formulated to meet and/or exceed the standards established in ASTM D 6083. Rust-Oleum 780 Elastomeric Roof Coating waterproofs and weatherproofs metal, weathered single ply membranes as well as smooth surface asphalt built-up and modified bitumen roofing substrates.

Johns Manville Corbond® Open-cell Spray Foam is a lower density, nonstructural insulation that offers an R-Value of R-3.8 per inch. It delivers high yield, minimizes sound transmission and virtually eliminates any air leakage. It's designed to improve energy efficiency for a wide variety of residential, commercial and industrial applications and can act as an effective air barrier.
If your foam pulled away just a little bit, Jamie, and they were able to fix it with just a little bit of touching up, then it wasn't as bad as the house where I saw this problem. As the last photo above shows, it had pulled away significantly from the studs and rafters, and it was all over the house. This was closed cell foam, and interestingly, it didn't pull away from the horizontal framing members, just the vertical and sloped ones. They did some touch up, but that wasn't enough. I don't know how this one ended up getting resolved. I think maybe the contractor came back and sprayed cellulose on top of the foam.

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Liquid Roof is a specially formulated version of Liquid Rubber that has the flexibility needed for vehicles that are traveling and causing significant amounts of tension as it travels and turns. If your RV is stationary the entire year you can order the Liquid Rubber but if you do travel with your RV you will need to purchase the Liquid Roof. Note applying the Liquid Rubber over an RV will void its warranty.
OK, Peter, I finally went back and read Alex Wilson's article on what he perceives as a serious problem. I haven't seen the full report, but based on the summary he wrote on the Green Building Advisor website, I question the science. It seems to me that he's chosen the wrong metric and he's basing his conclusion on too many assumptions because he doesn't have enough data. You can see my comments at the end of his article.
One of the high-tech insulation products being utilized these days is a foam-spray product called "Icynene," which is a foam that starts as two liquid components (a and b, if you will) that are heated up and sent through two hoses and meet at a tip of a gun where the magic begins. This is a thin film that expands to 100 times its volume in eight seconds, when it's permanently set up.

If you’re not familiar, spray foam is a type of insulation that expands after you spray. The foam expands and seals, avoiding any type of unnecessary moisture (which can create mold) or encouraging pests to eat through your walls. It protects the lining of your house, and even can protect the heating and cooling of your house during those unbearably cold or hot days.
Heat which is created elsewhere that is transported by means of a fluid, such as water or in our case air. Spray foam insulation's most important attribute is the ability to air seal creating a custom airtight envelope within the building structure. The added benefit to air sealing is the ability to block convective heat transfer from interior to exterior during heating months and vice versa during cooling months, as the heat cannot escape through gaps in the buildings envelope without the aid of air movement from infiltration as a means of transport. http://youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o&app=desktop

We live in middle TN and had our house foamed last year. We noticed recently that some of the foam was shrinking and seperating from the floor joists. We contacted the installer and he informed us that the manufacturer had a problem with a batch of foam during the time frame we had our house sprayed. The contractor wasn't sure if we had the recalled batch installed in our house or not. He said he would check the batch numbers and let us know. He seems like a nice guy promising to do whatever it takes to fix any problems. Do we trust him, however, to be truthful about the batch number? Do we have any options for finding out the information ourselves? I inspected the entire crawl space of the house and noticed approximately (5) areas that were seperating and a couple areas where the foam didn't adhere to the block. Do I assume by it being so infrequent that it is nothing to be concerned about? My concern is the walls that are not capable of being visually inspected because of sheetrock. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLAUsiuI_o
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