We have a 1950's ranch in Atlanta and are interviewing foam contractors to spray open cell under the roof, with an "ankle wall" out towards the eaves to seal the attic. My wife and daughters are chemically sensitive, so I'm trying to figure out how to minimize the fumes coming into the house. Additionally, at least one contractor has offered (for > $900) to remove our existing rock wool & R-13 fibreglass from the attic floor to "increase cross-ventilation into the attic". Seems to me I can't both minimize fumes AND increase cross-ventilation. They also offered to spray a fire-retardant on for >$600. Would ventilation during installation help any or woud the retardant seal off the foam and help that way? Thanks...
When it comes to insulating the house, fiberglass tends to be the common form of insulation. However, after comparing fiberglass and spray foam insulation, it’s shocking how fiberglass tends to be the lesser of the two. Although it has deemed reliable over the years, there are way more benefits to insulating your home with spray foam. One of those benefits includes regulating the temperature of your house.

The local foam installer that I used here in Hilton Head told me he looked for some peeling back of the foam. This was ensuring that it was at the perfect temperature which helped them maximize their yield (profit). I have open cell foam and it pulled away a little, and did so immediately (within minutes). They went back after they were done to any spots that pulled away too much and filled them with the touch up kit; they were looking for the top edge to roll just a little bit. 

How Much Is Spray Foam Insulation Per Square Foot


This is in great contrast to my friend's experience. Her attic spaces were sprayed and the foam is actually pretty, and I was in her attic 6-7 days after it was sprayed and could hardly smell anything when I stuck my face up to the foam. And she did not have to clean up one speck of dust during or after the spraying. I got the name/number of the guy from her who managed her attic project, but between the time he did my house and the time he did her house, he was let go from the company who did her attic and hired by another company. He assured me everything would be the same, etc., etc., and I had no reason to believe anything had changed, but the sprayers who did my house later admitted they had never sprayed an attic before and I also found out that the foam used in my attic was from a different manufacturer. Neither my friend nor I had any idea this guy was with different company then, until the week after they filled my attic with off ratio foam, and my home with toxic vapors.  
I don't know if it's common or uncommon, but installing a layer of rigid foam above your roof sheathing in order to interrupt thermal bridging is always a good idea, and is preferable in all respects to a roof assembly without any rigid foam above the sheathing. If you decide to install rigid foam above the roof sheathing, you shouldn't use closed-cell spray foam under the sheathing; either use open-cell spray foam (which is vapor-permeable) or a fluffy insulation like cellulose, mineral wool, or fiberglass (any of which will allow the roof sheathing to dry to the interior).
Most closed-cell spray foam is now formed using hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents that have high global warming potential, partially or completely offsetting the climate benefits of the energy savings they can offer. In the United States, HFCs are scheduled to be phased out by January, 2021. A few spray foam suppliers have started supplying spray foam blown with hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) blowing agents without this problem as of early 2017.[14]
The problem you saw with the closed cell foam pulling away like that is due to the heat of the foam was to hot. It was actually curing out and making foam before it could adhere to the wood. The installer wasn't reading his foam correctly. He should of stopped and turned down the heat on his hose temp. Also installers have to be aware that as the sun rises and the temp in attics rises the subtrates get hotter as well. This will cause the installer to adjust his heat when installing the foam as the temp changes thru out the day.    

There are several types of reflective roof coatings that impart varied reflectance rates/ values. Typically, the reflective coatings are what are commonly referred to as white coatings and there are also aluminum coatings typically used with asphalt. Highly reflective white roof coatings are typically comprised of acrylics, urethanes, silicones, SBS, SEBS, and other types.

Spray Foam Crawl Space


Light-density open-cell SPF is commonly known as half-pound foam. It is a semi-rigid material with a sponge-like appearance that expands during installation and creates small, open cells that are filled with carbon dioxide. Due to its ability to expand during the application process, it fills cracks, crevices and voids and adheres to irregular surfaces or substrates to form an air sealing insulation.[12]

Spray Foam Roofing


Light-density open-cell SPF is commonly known as half-pound foam. It is a semi-rigid material with a sponge-like appearance that expands during installation and creates small, open cells that are filled with carbon dioxide. Due to its ability to expand during the application process, it fills cracks, crevices and voids and adheres to irregular surfaces or substrates to form an air sealing insulation.[12]

Spray Foam Roofing


There are several types of reflective roof coatings that impart varied reflectance rates/ values. Typically, the reflective coatings are what are commonly referred to as white coatings and there are also aluminum coatings typically used with asphalt. Highly reflective white roof coatings are typically comprised of acrylics, urethanes, silicones, SBS, SEBS, and other types. 

Spray Foam Crawl Space


Roof leak repairs with roof coatings are often made after the damage has been done. However, you can avoid roof leaks and unnecessary damage altogether if you keep up on routine roof maintenance. A surprising 65 percent of roof replacements are performed because of roof leaks. Leak repair is a top priority among building owners and managers. Break the roof-repair cycle with liquid EPDM Roof Coatings. Liquid Rubber has also formulated custom EPDM Coatings and EPDM Rubber Coatings for your specific commercial and industrial needs. Liquid Roof and Liquid Rubber are liquid EPDM products for leaks repair that form a membrane of 100% pure EPDM rubber when cured. This rubber coating is specially formulated for roof repair and leaks repair. EPDM rubber coatings can be widely used for commercial purposes.
I live in Baton Rouge LA with a very old and drafty house. There is no blockages in the walls between the crawl space and attic. Lots of critters just come on in. I would like to used closed cell sprayed under house to warm up floors and block moisture. I would like to spray closed cell into attic, but am afraid of enclosing attic due to moisture build-up. Can I spray closed cell against the attic floor in same way as installing bats, thus leaving my venting the same as it always has been. Other ideas? Thanks.

Ames® Roof Coatings are premium elastomeric coatings that seal out moisture, renew old surfaces and even save energy. We have products specifically formulated for all types of roofs including; Wood, Tar, Metal, Rolled Roofing, EPDM Rubber, Foam and many other surfaces. Ames’ coatings form a waterproof seal to preserve and protect your roof. Our white roof coatings reflect sunlight, substantially reducing roof temperatures. Ames® products are environmentally friendly, waterbase, non-toxic, VOC-free and water cleanup.


Light-density open-cell SPF is commonly known as half-pound foam. It is a semi-rigid material with a sponge-like appearance that expands during installation and creates small, open cells that are filled with carbon dioxide. Due to its ability to expand during the application process, it fills cracks, crevices and voids and adheres to irregular surfaces or substrates to form an air sealing insulation.[12]

Amanda previously has worked as a breaking news and crime reporter, TV news producer, and editor in Flint and Detroit. Throughout her career as a journalist, she has won several awards from the Detroit Chapter of Society of Professional Journalists and the Michigan Press Association. As part of the RetroFoam of Michigan family, Amanda uses her experience as a journalist to write content that will help educate homeowners on the benefits of foam insulation. When Amanda isn’t writing, she’s spending time with her husband and rescued huskies. She also loves knitting, making art, cooking, and hosting dinner and a movie night for friends and family. 

How Much To Spray Foam Crawl Space

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